Category Archives: Medical Illustration and History

Kate Lacour: challenging the Codex Seraphinianus in the category of surreal, faux-anatomical weirdness

When Kate Lacour sent me a link to her tumblr, sharkbrains (subtitle: “Body horror beauty – art and comics”), I didn’t know quite what to expect. What I found was delightful – a modern successor to the Codex Seriphinianus.

Posted in Artists & Art, Biology, Blogs and Blogging, Ephemera, Medical Illustration and History, Uncategorized, Wonder Cabinets, Yikes! | Comments Off

October 5: NYC Festival of Medical History and the Arts

Due to some very unfortunate trip planning on my part, I will be on the other side of the country when some of my favorite people appear at the Festival of Medical History and the Arts in three weeks. Don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Blogs and Blogging, Education, Events, History of Science, Medical Illustration and History, Science in culture & policy | Comments Off

A few design links: curvilinear copper bird feeder, spiny vodka, and type hunting

This gorgeous copper birdfeeder, which is hands-down the most elegant bird feeder I’ve ever seen, was designed “by a Swiss-trained metal craftsman. Together with his wife, he developed the piece‚Äôs unique curvilinear form by using cardboard paper.” (seen at Better … Continue reading

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Jewelled skeletons: how Damien Hirst was scooped 500 years ago

Remember when bad-boy artist Damien Hirst got all that press for covering a human skull in diamonds? According to a new book by Paul Koudounaris, Heavenly Bodies: Cult Treasures and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs, he was about 500 years … Continue reading

Posted in Artists & Art, Books, Medical Illustration and History, Museum Lust | Comments Off

BioE is so redundant right now

Steam of Consciousness by Chris Conte (updated: look! I found a moving .gif on the artist’s website! It’s at the bottom of the post). It’s really amazing to me how mainstream anatomical art, steampunk, etc. has become in the past … Continue reading

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Coin-operated morticians are not easy to find

Just in case you’ve always wanted a vintage coin-operated morgue diorama with clockwork morticians and mourners, you are totally in luck! Thanks, Morbid Anatomy!

Posted in Medical Illustration and History, Retrotechnology, Yikes! | Comments Off

Histology-Inspired Artist of the Day: Andrea Offerman

Andrea Offerman‘s intricate pen and ink drawings are some hybrid of children’s book illustrations and Hieronymous Bosch-ian anatomical panoramas. Andrea says, I was always interested in art but hesitant to make it my profession. I studied medicine for a few … Continue reading

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Anatomical chairs for your medical library?

From my friend Shana: wonderful anatomical wingchairs: “Tante Wera” wingchairs: “Flow” Limited edition

Posted in Conspicuous consumption, Frivolity, Medical Illustration and History, Science | Comments Off

Metaphors of Neurobiology: A neuroscientist-artist explains his work

Required reading: this essay by Pablo Garcia-Lopez on the interaction between neuroscience and the arts: My work as an artist is directly inspired by my experience as a neuroscientist. I completed my PhD in conjunction with the Museum Cajal, working … Continue reading

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Pretty bones; hollow phrase

LIFE magazine may be no more, but the LIFE website still has lovely archival eye candy including these b/w photos, circa 1950, of skeletons and bones. Says the website, Seen in a certain light, and photographed for LIFE by the … Continue reading

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